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, and it has a big role. it protects public health. however, its primary use for us is disinfection. disinfection of drinking water and also the treatment of water. it is also used for odor control in our waste water collection system. so it will be this last piece that i will be focusing the discussion on today. this was question a lot in the media, so i will talk about that in one piece. i should note that it is one of the many methods that we used to combat odor in waste water. so where do we use this? on the charts year, about 50% of the sodium hypochlorite is used for disinfecting water. about 30% is used for disinfecting and treating waste water, and the remaining amount is used for over control -- odor control. it is not the only chemical we use. we also use peroxide and a ferriss solution -- ferous -- ferrous solution. they are cite specific. this is basically from where the odors are coming from. you want to know what this costs. that is what you are looking at there. while the total chemical addition has gone down, you will note that for sodium hypochlorite, it has actuall
years now. i'm just going to read parts of the letter that was provided to us on behalf of a local resident, and i will give this to you when i'm done. "dear supervisors, i'm writing in reference to a hearing scheduled march 14 in reference to a contract the city has entered with the electric tour company. my understanding is certain groups are opposing these out of a concern for safety for other uses where they are proposed to operate. it is my belief based on my experience as a segway owner and operator that these complaints are groundless and should not prevent them from proceeding with this contract did tour services. i'm a resident of district 7 and an employee of salesforce.com i am an owner of model i2. i have operated it nearly 1,500 miles, many of which have been navigated in san francisco. opponents to the operation include a group that supported san francisco ordinance 241-02, which banned operations of epa md's on public transit. walk sf is one such group, and their web page includes a list of arguments that were largely speeches including speculative and groundless cla
the operations and maintenance of those lights that are handed over to us said that we install. if we have a right up of what it would cost. $93 a light if this is a standard light, $39 if this is a highly efficient light. a total over 20 years shown their which is substantially less when it is an alley the light. -- when it is an led light. two of the examples i showed you have pedestrian writing styles are lights that were installed that have not been turned by the developers. this is part of the reason that gets us to the podium today is that the developers are trying to hand the street lights off and the redevelopment agency is trying to hand the pedestrian writing off. they're asking us to assume responsibility for those. there are other projects in developing queue. the department of public works is looking to us to become the owner. i'm happy to take any questions. >> why do they cost more than lead to maintain --led to maintain? >> standard lights consume more electricity, they burn out at a faster rate. this requires us to send a crew out and take the lead out and chan
of the great new year food. it brought us together but it was also an opportunity to share our culture with others, bring more unity among all of our communities. half the lunar new year to everyone and let's unite our communities together. thank you. [applause] >> good evening, my name is carmen chu. i will keep my message brief. i want to wish everyone a happy lunar new year. again, this is a time that is important to many of merit -- asian-american families because of the importance of bringing together family. i think we can all replicate this, the matter what community we live in. so i want to say happy new year. [speaking chinese] [applause] >> good evening. [speaking korean] in the new year, may have much good luck and fortune. new year's was a time for my family to get together and build community but also to reflect on the previous year, what challenges lie ahead of us. today at the board of supervisors, we recognized black history month. for me, that is always a reflection of the work of people that have come before us so that we can be where we are today. as asian americans,
't use violence against his people. does it show how little leverage the u.s. has in yemen now? >> reporter: we are seeing more and more the past few weeks, it looks as though the u.s. has more leverage. we saw a comment from the president in the last few weeks saying the u.s. shouldn't meddle. foreigners shouldn't intervene in the affairs there. there was a call between john brennan, the assistant to the president for homeland security. he was there telling yemen president they were praising him for his initiative and make sure they protect the protesters there. they agreed to that. today, you are seeing a crackdown, again. this is worrying to the u.s. there should be dialogue in yemen. the president is saying there should be. but we are seeing more and more violence in the streets. >> joining us live from abu dabi. that you know for that. >>> a critical and dangerous situation is going on right now with two nuclear plants damaged by the massive quake in japan. to make a bad situation worse, an explosion at one of them today. we have the latest coming up. [ male announcer ] 95
is heading into the country. plus, what country is going to take charge? what role will the u.s. play? and did the u.n. vote come too late to stop gadhafi? will gadhafi fight for the death or accept some kind of deal. answer those questions as we prepare to fight in a third muslim country. and japanese authorities have raised the assessment of a nuclear disaster to a five -- that's three mile island level on a seven-point scale and they now more or less admit they are overwhelmed. wow. they're employing a throw against the wall and see what sticks approach in the nuclear commission. it says it can take weeks to get this thing under control. score one for the unions in wisconsin. the judge has temporarily blocked the new law shrinking collective bargaining rights in that state. wow, democrats hope this is the first of many obstacles. republicans say, it's just a speed bump, check it out. let me finish with libya. we know how we're getting in. but do you have any idea how we're going to get out? we start on libya. richard engle is joining us from cairo. thank you, richard, give us a sen
in benghazi. the goal, to protect the people of libya. now a senior u.s. military official tells cnn the u.s. has launched its first air strikes in the western part of the country. those u.s. tomahawk missiles have landed in the area around tripoli and misrata. >> and this as moammar gadhafi sends letters to the u.n. and its allies warning them to stay out of his country. >> meanwhile, the leader behind the u.n. resolution gathered in paris today to map out the road ahead. french warplanes are circling over libya, enforcing that yuu. sanctioned no-fly zone. >> and they have flexed military muscle firing on a libyan military vehicle. our senior international correspondent, nic robertson, is joining us right now from tripoli. nic, there were some reports that there were loud booming noises. now perhaps we know in large part why. perhaps as a result of those u.s. tomahawk missile strikes? >> reporter: yeah. it's not possible for us to confirm it at the moment in tripoli. there certainly would be a number of targets here. the former u.s. air base east of the city here houses not only some of the
, that would use some unused land there, but in talking to korea and driving around her area, there were a number -- but in talking to her and driving around her area, there were a number of pieces of land. another was a property we have in el camino. it does not really front in el camino, and they were working through a general plan update for her area, and whether it is housing in the area or something else -- so that is the work that we would typically hire a consultant for that we could do this with a city staff person also, so that is what that man was hired to do. he did some research, visited the sites, did a variety of things, and issued a report for puc parcels. management said they were happy with the work. there is a pair of the speculation for why he would be interested -- there is apparently speculation for what he would be interested. i wanted to discuss the general issue, because it is one that will likely come up, and it is the question of buying back retirement credits. i am concerned that it could be viewed as breaking the rules. our retirement system in the city is not
to support us. we especially want to give him this award for being the first state legislator in the country to find family planning for low- income women. in the 1970's, when he was on the national board of planned parenthood. i do not know if you know that, but i was there. we want to give him a weapon today to help us as a fundamentalists tried to take those rights away from us. mayer browor brown -- [laughter] [applause] >> may the force be with you. [laughter] they the force be with you and with us -- may the force be with you and with us. >> a jedi warrior. now you know what was behind that mask darth vader was wearing. me. >> at this time, i want to acknowledge a couple of people outside of our committee. >> so it's a tremendous honor to be here today. we've got a tremendous program for you. this is our annual black history month kickoff. it was started many, many years ago. dr. carter g. woodson had participated in the founding of black history month. he was involved in the group known as the oh, -- association for the study of african-american life and history. the local chapter of
on passive heating and cooling, instead of using the archaic methods overpower -- method of steam loops. president vietor: thank you. hello, sir. >> good afternoon. president vietor: congratulations on the power plant. >> thank you. president vietor: you worked hard on that. >> and this would really make my day complete, moving this along. i have been on the power plant taskforce since its inception, and i think that is 11 years now. we pushed hard, and we got the first electric resource plan, an ordinance that made both the department of the environment and the puc -- which was adopted in 2002. since then, we have been encouraging either side or all sides to keep it up. things have changed. the recommendations that were made in 2002 were in some ways very aggressive and in some ways were not, and for the most part, i think it had to do with that we gain a lot of knowledge as we move through life, and, certainly, at this point, this report is not a directive, per se. it is an outline. it identifies so many challenges and gives a so many potential solutions -- and did so many poten
today to support your approval of the san francisco electric tour company's use of golden gate park. they are highly qualified, as you can tell from what you have heard today. i am sure they will do an outstanding job for you. it seems strange to be dating segway use at all. here we are in san francisco, where the police officers are, at this moment, at the largest airport, conducting safety and security operations on board segways. it works there just fine. in san jose, they use them as well. around the world, segways are used for various purposes. tours are just a small part of that. supervisor mar: could i just say -- this is in an historic park with many sensitive areas, wildlife, plants, so it might be different from the airport. >> i am quite aware of the value of the park. that is why we put segway tours in the park. we appreciate the chance to be there. golden gate park is entirely too big to be seen by foot. you cannot walk the whole park. you cannot drive the whole park. there are not trams to take you around. the best way to see golden gate park is by segways. i believe y
the segways travel single file and are courteous. please let them continue to use the paths they arkin -- currently using, as they have proven their dedication to safety. thank you. supervisor mar: thank you. >> good morning, supervisors. thank you for your thoughtful consideration on matters before you today. my name is todd barbie, i was raised in san francisco. i spent 45 years in join the wonder of golden gate park. i am a development and marketing consultant and i co-authored the electric car company's proposal in response to the rfp from the rec and parks department. the agency responsible for administering the park and the safety of the guests you visit -- who visit has been working on this innovative fund to bring a green and low impact immunity to the park. the goals and objectives, as outlined in the rfp, are to safely make -- and hence the user experience, amenities, and provide jobs for city coffers. rec and parks did exceptional due diligence on this matter, studying in the context of golden gate park operations, and then commissioning others to operate the said wait for t
launched by the u.s. and other countries. president obama again making the case for why the u.s. went in, but how does it end? >>> in japan, the disaster deepens with new problems at the nuclear plant. there are new fears about food safety and an american family has received the worst possible news about their daughter. our teams are on the ground. "nightly news" begins now. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> good evening. in addition to two wars on two other fronts, the united states military tonight is engaged against libya. the attacks are in the form of air strikes. 32 of them in just the last 24 hours. about half now being carried out by u.s. aircraft. and there have been 136 cruise missiles launched. only eight of them by british armed forces. the rest launched by the u.s. they have hit targets up and down the libyan coastline, mostly aimed at libyan defenses, so the coalition aircraft can begin enforcing that no-fly zone over a larger portion of the country. the united states says moammar gadhafi is not a target personally, but president obama says the u.s. acted in
, mayor edwin lee, thank you, general counsel, for spending some time with us. he is here every year with us. now this year we have not only mayor edwin lee, as an historical time in san francisco. we have four asian-american members of the board of supervisors with us. as a representative of district 3, i could not be more happy to introduce my district supervisor, the president of the board, supervisor david chiu. [applause] >> good evening, everyone. it is an honor to be with you tonight. i want to wish everyone a happy year of the rabbit. unless you are vietnamese, in which case, i was a very happy year of the cat. after 160 years, this year is truly history. i am honored to serve with you, not just with the diversity that our board of supervisors represents -- and i want to thank ross mirkarimi, david campos, and malia cohen who are here with us today -- but it is an honor to serve with three other asian-american supervisors. we finally reflect the population statistics that we have here in san francisco. more importantly, it was an incredible honor earlier this year to take par
u.s. destroyers in the mediterranean and three u.s. sub marines and one british sub marine. they were fired off of those at 2:00 p.m. eastern time. takes about an hour flying time for the tomahawks to strike their targets. there were about 20 targets evenly divided between the capital of tripoli as well as misred aed ta where we he do understand from reports on the ground that an air force academy was targeted there as well as the main air base that qadaffi has. also, two strikes against sert, the hometown of qadaffi but none against benghazi where the rebels are holed up. they wanted to avoid any casualties in benghazi. >> judge jeanine: that, of course, being the rebel stronghold. we are now six hours into the cruz missile attack. is it true that it will take in fact hours more for us to know the full extent of the cruz missile attacks? >> reporter: i think they are starting to get some reports. one u.s. defense official says that qadaffi's defense systems basically an sa 5 old soviet era defense system, ironically the same that was used by saddam hussein exactly 8 years
>>> this is a fox news alert. we are tracking the action in libya, we're told the u.s. will launch missile strikes against libyan air defenses within the hour. french jets launching air strikes on libyan tanks and now nato members preparing jets to head to libya to protect citizens of the north african country. they are wrapping up an emergency meeting in paris a short time ago as french warplanes circle the skies enforce the no-fly zone. hello, welcome to a brand-new hour. >> jamie: i'm jamie colby. the situation in libya is quickly developing as nato counties shift military resources to the region. molly henneberg is tracking that and live in the d.c. bureau. molly, good to see you. secretary clinton it's so unusual to hear from how severe things they are. should she did have a couple diplomatic points she wanted to make very clear clear. tell us about those. >> molly: that the u.s. backed international efforts to prevent libyan leader from muammar khadafy from attacking his own people but the u.s. would be taking a supportive role in any operation. >> we did not lead this. we di
this opportunity in challenge us all to take all the information, the ideas and the best intentions from today and make a real commitment to work together to make our schools and our streets safer. i know that's a no brainer and something said a million times in the past. but my experience to work together and really collaborate is much more difficult that most of us are willing to commit. it's easy to do things on our own. we can do things the way we want to and all the credit is ours if we are successful. we can accomplish so much more together than we ever could on our own. to work together. the first thing we have to do is look within. it's easy to play the blame game and see the fault in others. the cbo's aren't doing they are supposed to. no it's the police's fault. it's city haul's fault. but in the end. that gets us nowhere. we can never truly work together unless we stop assigning blame. the second thing we must do. we must be open to the possibility there's a better way to do things. too often as i sat through discussions ask encountered reluctance to change. i would ask you if we h
legislative leaders? are they supportive? >> at the risk of having linda shut us down, there have been many discussions over the weeks. >> before you ask another question, let me just say, i believe there is enough direction here to calendar a discussion. i really don't want you to get into a discussion of an item that is not agendized. >> and it would be moved into the afternoon? >> and we are trying to shift a treasure island to the morning session. the team -- or if they have noticed it for a later afternoon eating -- meeting. president olague: it might be possible to schedule them both for the morning. >> it would be appropriate. president olague: i think it is critical that we discuss this, because i was privy to a panel discussion earlier today and i was informed of a project that i did not really know where under redevelopment. whose future might be questionable. >> if we can pull that off, we will also have to check with mr. blackwell. we will do everything we can to try to take that happen. -- maketha that happen. president olague: i think it would be important to put it on the cal
continues, with more efforts to cool down the reactors. what they are doing is using chinook helicopters to drop sea water. they have been addressing the media, just about one hour ago. here is what was said. >> the two leaders talked to each other on the phone, from 10:22 a.m. to 10:52 a.m. president barack obama expressed symphony -- sympathy, and he also offered support, including support related to nuclear power plants and also mid-term and long-term rehabilitation initiatives. prime minister kan expressed gratitude to president obama for his support. the self-defense forces and police, all of those who are concerned are doing their best, and the prime minister can explain this to president obama. the people in charge of disaster relief and operations are doing their best, and also, the two leaders agreed to cooperate on the nuclear power plant issues. >> mr. edano has really been the face of this crisis, addressing the media every day, and here is what he had to say about the latest thames -- the latest attempts to drop the sea water to cool them. >> to drop water from the air, and
by either -- a different type of examination according to the top of power that we use. the previous gentleman was mentioning about how steam loops are a bad thing, and in the traditional fashion, they probably are. an apartment or units or development, instead of a traditional water boiler, a steam heater, whatever, yes, you are burning fossil fuel, but you are getting a 85% sun, 87% efficiency, instead of the below 50% efficiency is -- but you are getting a 85%, 87% efficiency, instead of the below 50% efficiency if you are using natural gas. i do not think we will get rid of that in the next 10 years, but i would really encourage you to move this as it is, and, believe me, on march 24, the next task force meeting, we are really hoping that is our last meeting, because there were two things that we were tasked with, including closing power plants, so it would really make my day. thank you. president vietor: thank you. public comments? any further public comments? i just wanted to clarify this amendment, and with the council's blessing, we can move it. this directs the general manag
have joined us. our conversation with susan jacoby, coming up. >> all i know is his name is james, and he needs extra help with his reading. >> i am james. >> yes. >> to everyone making a difference -- >> thank you. >> you help us all live better. >> nationwide insurance supports tavis smiley. with every question and every answer, nationwide insurance is proud to join tavis in working to improve financial literacy and remove obstacles to economic empowerment, one conversation at a time. >> nationwide is on your side >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. [captioning made possible by kcet public television] captioned by the national captioning institute --www.ncicap.org-- tavis: susan jacoby is a best- selling author. her latest is "never say die: the myth and marketing of the new old age." susan jacoby, a bit too heavy on this program. >> wonderful to be here. tavis: led to heavy. tell me about the marketing of this new old age. i see these commercials all the ti on television, people running through gardens. >> it is called age defying. it r
ent referral for you or someone you know, call 1-800-662-help. brought to you by the us department of health and human services. they tell me i was there but i don't remember. i don't know where i really was. i do not know what i had for breakfast. i do not know who won the game. i don't recognize this man. if you or someone you know is struggling with a drug or alcohol problem, there is a solution: recovery. call 1-800-662-help for information and for hope. through treatment my life's a whole lot brighter now. brought to you by the us department of health and human services. [music] language is such an important part of communicating with people what addiction, mental health disorders and recovery is all about. a lot of people have stereotypes about what these, what these disorders are all about and they're not accurate. and so using language can really help people understand what those disorders are about, what they mean, and how people are living successfully in recovery today. [music] our stories have power was the training that was developed by faces and voices of recovery in
a regulatory permit or licence, fees for use of government property, a rental fee, recreation and park fees, golf fees. many of the things we charge are exempt. in the short term, it does not have a large effect. the main effect is that it constrains our ability to grow what we currently have and it constraints of our ability to increase the rates which currently charge. it could have indirect effects to the extent that it constrains the state also. if the state is coming back on their services and we want environmental mitigation or public health programs the state used to provide and they do not do it anymore, the local government could have increased costs. the next slide is a quick summary of the approval requirement for different types of revenue before and after. sometimes we assume everybody knew what they were before. i thought i would give an overview of three general types of revenue and what it takes to increase them before and after proposition 26. a general purpose tax takes a majority vote of the electorate to pass, or a tax increase. to create or increase a tax requires a 50%
1983. what is before you is a proposed change of use for 1945 hyde street, the valencia garage. change it from a public parking facility to a residential condominium. in addition to this change in use is a request for a rear yard variants, which is before mr. sanchez today. my understanding is that a change of use must serve the community affected. the residents of russian hill would not be best served by granting this change of use. the density, topography, housing stock, and aging population will suffer with the loss of this parking garage. so mr. sanchez does not feel ignored this afternoon, the project sponsor is also requesting approval of a rearguard variance to reduce the required rear yard of 25 feet by 60% to 810-foot rear yard. since the developer would not be providing sufficient rearguard open space for the new residents, additional demands would be placed on the very little existing public open space in the neighborhood. please do not approve this change of use, and please do not approve this variance. thank you very much. commissioner olague: thank you. [reading names] >>
be filtered out and used for other products. >> [speaking spanish] >> it is going to be a good thing for us to take used motor oil from customers. we have a 75-gallon tank that we used and we have someone take it from here to recycle. >> so far, we have 35 people. we have collected 78 gallons, if not more. these are other locations that you can go. it is absolutely free. you just need to have the location open. you are set to go. >> so it's a tremendous honor to be here today. we've got a tremendous program for you. this is our annual black history month kickoff. it was started many, many years ago. dr. carter g. woodson had participated in the founding of black history month. he was involved in the group known as the oh, -- association for the study of african-american life and history. the local chapter of that group is what is now known as the african-american cultural and historical society. so it's an honor. we've been doing this for many, many years and it's great to see so many faces out here today. right now what i'd like to do is thank our partners and acknowledge them for their pa
with the department of environment and we are recycling oil. thank you. we can go into a refinery and we can use it again. they do oil changes and sell it anyway, so now they know when a ticket to a. hal>> to you have something you want to get rid of? >> why throw it away when you can reuse it? >> it can be filtered out and used for other products. >> [speaking spanish] >> it is going to be a good thing for us to take used motor oil from customers. we have a 75-gallon tank that we used and we have someone take it from here to recycle. >> so far, we have 35 people. we have collected 78 gallons, if not more. these are other locations that you can go. it is absolutely free. you just need to have the location open. you are set to go. [music] [applause] good afternoon, everybody. thank you for joining us today. the first thing i will ask you to do is put your hands together in front of our heart and bow slightly and say nanasta it means the good in me greets the good in all of you. who knows where is this is from? india. today we are sharing an form. we are members of the dance company based here in
adjustments using that leverage with celery on reserve to make decisions for the remainder of the year. now that we are further along, we are at the point where the department's operations would need to be adjusted significantly because of the shorter amount of time remaining in the year if we had to withhold spending. >> we are not aware of any interruptions or cause of disbursement of funds through the restoration process? >> i am not aware of any cause for problems in spending. if you are aware of any issues or hear of anything, i would be happy to work with the department. the direction to my office throughout the year has been clear. we have made a commitment that if the state budget came through and we did not have these large losses of revenues, it was our intent to fully expend those funds. any department that did not wish to, we wanted to talk with them. i fully believe that we have worked with our departments to the best of our ability to make sure that we followed through on it. supervisor chu: this item is now before us. are there any other questions? supervisor kim: quick follo
us time on the calendar this week and next to talk about treasure island. it is certainly a critical time for the project in the we are moving from the planning phase, which has been going on now for over 15 years, to the looking for approval for the many and various documents that actually implement the project and then on to the implementation phase, hopefully early next year. we have got about a 30-minute -- 20 or 30-minute presentation to touch on many of the aspects of the development, and then, we will be back before you next week to talk more. i just wanted to touch briefly on the governor's proposal regarding redevelopment and to eliminate redevelopment agency's. it obviously does have a bearing on the project. as you know, in front of the legislature now as part of the governor's budget package is a proposal to eliminate redevelopment agencies. and it limited our ability to issue tax increment bonds for projects such as this one. we have obviously been working hard with our state legislators as well as the governor's office to modify that bill to make sure projects like this
, fisherman's wharf area, and in sausalito. probably got in sausalito, we do a lot of the group areas -- multi-use areas, sidewalks, boardwalks. that sort of thing. it is very fun and safe. the people in blue behind me, first and foremost, we are instructors, and then tour guides after that. thank you. supervisor mar: thank you. >> good morning, supervisors. my name is maria o'donnell. i am a segway tour guide with the electric for company. this is what we use so people can hear our instructions on the tour. it is a radio. we have individual earbuds which we have new for each customer, which they are welcome to keep after. throughout the entire store, we are talking to them, giving them instructions, i am telling them about safety things, alerting them to pedestrians, cars, pot holes, bumps. i am always in constant contact with them. just so we are visible, we also where our jackets. you can really see. there is no way to miss us. the most thing is safety. i always make sure that everyone knows what they are doing. before we go on the tour, the training is so thorough, if i ever feel someone does
game of cat and mouse that the u.s. is fighting against drug smugglers. >>> "america at the crossroads." tonight why america's losing some of the best and brightest and how to keep them here. >>> and tired of it all. alarming news about a problem that impairs our economy, our health, our jobs, actually puts us in danger. "nightly news" begins us in danger. "nightly news" begins now. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> good evening. the president of the united states is now on record. the longtime libyan leader needs to leave and change must now come to libya. this is how the president put it at the white house today. >> let me just be very unambiguous about this. colonel gadhafi needs to step down from power and leave. that is good for his country. it is good for his people. it's the right thing to do. >> of course, that brings us to the question about how to do that, how to finish what the libyan uprising has started. there's growing support for a so-called no-fly zone, but the defense secretary continues to warn americans that would first mean a u.s. air attack on libya
and requested the very same documentation we used in our investigation but brown writes the information has not been provided to me which he minds disrespectful. >> we will put forth some to have same questions that came out in the story asked for answers we will have sessions here we will be questioning about all these issues. >> chairman brown says he knows a thing or two about upsetting tax payers after his own recent problems with thriving high priced city vehicles. >> there will be tax payers to say why is kwami brown after the trouble he has been through this week going to be the guy in charge looking how the money is being spent. >> well, one, the trucks have been returned, two, i have said that i would compensate for the time i used the vehicles, no taxpayer dollars currently spent further, and we are moving on. so i mean i think that is how you take responsibility you own up, make sure it goes back, don't throw anyone under the bus take full responsibility. >> you expect that same forth rightness from him. >>> yes, we expect the board of trustees to demand that. >> he expects to se
of the road to recovery. today we'll be talking about the language that we use on issues related to addiction and recovery. joining us in our panel today are: daphne baille, director of communications, treatment alternatives for safe communities, tasc incorporated, chicago, illinois. dr. john kelly, associate professor in psychiatry, massachusetts general hospital, harvard medical school, boston, massachusetts. lureen mcneil, director, bureau of recovery services, new york state office of alcoholism and substance abuse services, new york, new york. carlos hardy, director of public affairs, baltimore substance abuse systems, incorporated, baltimore, maryland. john, what role does language play in forming public opinion on addiction and mental health issues? i think language plays a critical role in the way that, after all, it's the, it conveys the meaning of, of what we're trying to express. and so i think it plays a very important role and we should think carefully about the terms that we use because of that. so, why does some language impede the understanding, lureen, of, of our field and th
to the public. >> what could be useful for us is to let us know in advance when those public comment opportunities would be before the decision is made. that would be helpful for us to get the word out to the community organizations. >> there are some meetings that are being coined now and there is also an e-mail that we would like families to use that is good opportunity for families to give us feedback as well. >> i know that the draft middle school theater pattern is currently in draft form. i'm not sure if it is prop it to talk about but -- i not sure if it is appropriate to talk about. there is a specialty language components and i don't see them assigned to any particular school. >> yes. >> ok. the graph shows a color pattern that indicates where different schools should be. i am sure there was probably some conversations that went into the proposals. perhaps in an intervening time, you could set up a time with our office and we are interested in looking at the different patterns. >> absolutely, we can call your office and talk about this. >> thank you. i would like to add to w
a good indication of what gadhafi's capable of. that's all for us tonight. >>> now, here's anderson cooper with "ac 360." >> thanks, piers. breaking news, smoke earlier today pouring from reactor two and three at the crippled plant, the fukushima daiichi plant. workers evacuated the unit. radiation levels prompting the u.s. military to consider mandatory evacuation of thousands of american troops and their families in japan. radioactive dust being detected at very low levels, we want to point out in seattle, washington. despite substantial progress over the weekend this is far from over. we're going to have the latest details at this hour, also the latest on the dead and missing now numbering 21,000. and the body of a young american teacher has been found. we talked about her on this show last week, her parents had been searching for her. she's the first known american fatality. we begin though with the attack on gadhafi forces in libya, now entering day four. allied forces launching as many as 80 missions today, that is up from yesterday. americans flying fewer than half of them, t
assess what the u.s. and the world are doing now, and what comes next. >> ifill: plus, we examine what the unrest in the middle east is doing to gas prices here at home. >> woodruff: then, we have the first of two reports from guatemala. tonight, ray suarez looks at programs aimed at combating a long history of domestic violence. >> suarez: as part of a nationwide effort to improve women's health these workshops are pushing back against a rape culture trying to lower the epidemic levels of violence against women and girls. >> ifill: and jeffrey brown talks to scott shane of the new york times about the obama administration's decision to resume military trials at the guantanamo bay prison. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> breathe in. breathe out. as volatile as markets have been lately, having the security of a strong financial partner certainly lets you breathe easier. for more than 140 years, pacific life has helped millions of americans build a secure financial future. wouldn't it be nice to take a deep breath and rel
and we are on item 11, case 2010.0628c and is a request for conditional use authorization at 23rd and 24th street. >> i recommend the approval with conditions to allow the establishment of a full-service restaurant doing business as pollo campero and is including an outdoor activity area that is not contiguous to the front property line. this project is being proposed between the mission street and commercial transit district and the planning department recommends approval with conditions at 2740 on the west side of mission street between 23rd and 24th street if proposed project is found to be necessary and desirable because it will occupy a currently vacant store front and create 70 new employment in the mission district which will be open to workers of lesser skill set. it is found necessary and desirable because the project is the neighborhood serving use and more importantly a use that will serve the expanding latin american imgrant community and add to the diverse at this time of the latin american fare in an area known for the heart of latino life and is necessary and desirable to
to ahead for us. pedestrian lighting is expected to increase in the coming years as more attention is paid to the streetscape. with the treatment by dpw, the definition of streets also bears on responsibility for pedestrians lighting. sometimes pictures help. here is a photo that shows rincon hill area. you can see a street light and to the left, a pedestrian light. this is an example of pedestrian lighting that was installed by the developer for and improve to the area. -- and then prove to the area. this is another light that is pedestrian scale. you can see the top of the light. this is a redevelopment- sponsored project. then we will have the lighting that gives you an example of the pedestrian scale lighting we are talking about. many of these projects are proposed by developers working with the city. the better street plan adoption means that any doctor who will rebuild a block or a number of blocks will be obligated to install pedestrian lighting. once the plan is in place to install it, who reviews the plan. who expects the work after it has installed. under the proposed pedestrian
understand the importance of broadband and encourage them to participate to use broadband in their daily lives. things like -- things like how to find a job online, how to access city services online, how to communicate with family members. those types of things will be handled primarily by our community partners, but in the department of technology, we need administrative personnel to help us manage that and make sure they are doing what they are supposed to be doing under the grant. supervisor mirkarimi: that sounds great, but to me, it is just a question of growing government more so and not really understanding what the total objective is. when we benefit from these federal grants, i am not seeing what the goals are, at least not in what is provided before us. i also want to take this gratuitous moment to remind the department of technology, that if part of the premise -- for me, and us -- is to build inclusion of san franciscans into having access to technology, being able to elevate their level of information, and transmitting and receiving, i do not understand, ofor $60,000, of do
, that decision has not been made yet. >> to help us interpret this paula newton is at nato headquarters in bell ygium. the nato secretary-general said that nato will enforce the no-fly zone, but a decision is still yet to be made on the broader mission. so what does that really mean? >> what it means is this. they call this here no-fly plus. the no-fly will be in place by sunday night. the plus means an expanded role. they sent a directive saying how can we involved in a new robust role. >> i have to interpret you for a moment. secretary of state hillary clinton is making a estimate. hillary clinton. >> i met with the president and national security team. i want to give you an update on the international community's efforts to implement u.n. security council resolutions 1970 and 1973 and protect the civilians of libya. events have moved very quickly, so let's be clear about where we stand and how we got here. when the libyan people sought to realize their democratic aspirations they were met by extreme violence by their own government. the libyan people appealed to the world to help stop the th
developing situation out of libya. >> heather: the u.s. navy has three submarines for operations against libya but france fired the opening shots and military intervention. protests continuing around libya despite muammar khadafy refuting reports that he is firing on his own people. he says she prepared to die for his country. >> gregg: steve harrigan is streaming live. what is the latest there? >> a lot of nervous gunfire on the ground on the capitol coming from the ground, small arms fire as well as anti-aircraft fire. we are not sure what they are exactly shooting here. reports of cruise fires, state television in libya saying they have hit the capitol of tripoli but i'm standing here we would hear a cruise missile. it has not hit air defense systems here yet. it's clear that french warplanes are in the fight around the city of benghazi. 20 french jets enforcing the no-fly zone. they have engaged one libyan military vehicle and they destroyed four government tanks, unfirmed reports. people are fleeing to the east as fast as they can. khadafy government forces are inside the city with
-- if there are other groups you would like us to meet with a were other things you would like us to look at, please just let us know. >> commissioners. public comment. >> this is what i came here for so i'm very happy to have stayed around here for it. this is one of my major -- this is kind of like my major area of focus. i really appreciate the work that the waste water enterprise has done. you have a very long way to go. when i walked in, the conversation that commissioner moran was making are similar to those that we have had in the letter. we passed a resolution, one of the first expressed our concerns that the trend towards agreeing and low impact to the element was used and we did not want to make investments without having a specific benefit. one of the members of the technical advisory committee, which is now defunct, which is from seattle public utilities. they have a cost benefit model that they have been using for more than a decade. i don't think that the task force is really the model that you are looking for. this is really a watershed council that you need. he will start with the co
check and verify information from property profiles. it could be mixed use as long as the building as long as we can issue report. we checked for a zoning and whether or not the building has already complied. then we have to start our research. we have all kinds of resources. san francisco, old history. in the early 1920's, 1930's, that is a lot of old building permits. in the old days we would microfilm building permits. one of the resources that we use were 60 millimeter micro film roles. and then we moved into a computerized scanning system. we have all kinds of resources to work with. sometimes in that process we have to work with the building division. we have to work with housing inspection. some records are just not clear enough for us. so, the process is quite expensive before we finally have all of the data. >> you say that it takes six days, generally? how soon can that be done? how long has along this taken? >> the best that we can do from beginning to end, it can take two hours. if it is just a repeat request, it might take one hour. the longest one we are doing right n
will the u.s. play? and did the u.n. vote dom lay to stop gadhafi? will he accept some kind of deal? we'll try to answer those questions. also, japanese authorities have raised the assessment of the disaster to a five, three mile island level on a seven-point scale and now admit they're overwhelmed employing a throw it against the wall and see what sticks approach. the head of the u.s. nuclear regulatory commission says it could take weeks to get things under control. >>> score one for the unions in wisconsin. a judge has temporarily blocked that new law blocking collective bargaining rights in that state. democrats hope this is the first of many obstacles to that law they hate. we'll check it out. >>> let me finish with libya. do we have any idea how we'll get out. we start with the growing crisis in libya. richard engel joins us from cairo. give us a sense of what's happening as the u.n. begins to take action. what is the condition of the rebel force, entirely benghazi? >> reporter: the rebel force is very weak in benghazi and across the country. what happened was the rebels advanced
>> as you all know, the german marshall fund vehicle very kind to provide us with this -- has been very kind to provided us with this opportunity to have four of their european experts in bicycle planning, bicycle implementation and bicycle programs and they are experts on all aspects of the bicycle. and here in san francisco, you know, we are at this point trying to after a hiatus of three years because of court-ordered injunctions trying to implement our bike plan. so we all a collective goal, i believe, to increase the environmental and nick sustainability of the world around us that we participate in and especially in san francisco, but we do have a special responsibility because this place provides us with the opportunity that most other places don't. the geometry and geography of san francisco is up that it is easier for us being in a city of short trips to veil ourselves to other alternatives to the car. so when we want to reclaim the street and the public right-of-way and the public realm for people and basic human needs of access to the humanities that urban environments p
libya since the operation was launched 24 hours ago. >> u.s. joint chiefs of staff chairman mike mullen says most of gadhafi's air defense systems and airfields have been taken out. libyan ground forces have also been hit. >> the no-fly zone is effectively in place. we have combat air patrol or aircraft over benghazi and we will have them there for on a 24/7 basis. move that to the west and he hasn't flown any aircraft for the last two days. the whole goal here is to get it in place. two, be in a position so that he is unable to massacre his own civilians and that we effect the humanitarian support. from that standpoint, the initial operations have been very effective. >> besides the u.s. britain and france countries taking part in the libyan operation include italy, spain, canada, and qatr. >> gadhafi vowed to fight back what he calls terrorists attacking his country. >> we be victorious. we will achieve victory on behalf of the people. we have allah with us. have you the devil on your side. >> he called coalition nation it is new nazis and promised a, quote, long drawn war. >> nic rob
in washington president obama is facing lots of criticism for the u.s. mission in libya. two and a half hours from now he'll try to ease concerns about the operation's goals, its costs and the end game. his remarks coming a little over a week from the first coalition air strikes and critical time for opposition fighters on the ground. gadhafi's troops wiped out some of the gains but in recent days coalition air strikes have helped rebels seize some of the northern stays. now to reza sayah with more on benghazi. what's the latest information, ressa, that you are getting. >> reporter: these forces had an impressive three days capturing five towns from the gadhafi forces. today they finally met some resistance, the first in about 72 hours. that resistance coming in the city of sirte, gadhafi's birthplace, his hometown. when you talk to opposition officials here they anticipated a fights there and they got t.rebel figorces pushing back a one rebel fighter telling cnn that he and a group of other fighters cornelio sommaruga gadhafi soldiers waving a right flag, that, of course, the universal signa
this situation and didn't necessarily think u.n. action or u.s. action was necessary or something that should happen. what was the turning point for you where you thought, okay, it's time to go? >> well, first of all, i laid out the conditions required, which were the u.n. security council resolution and arab league support. and i saw them being taken. and then i thought about what the consequences were if gadhafi was allowed to continue to use force in defiance of international opinion. and so gadhafi looks like he'll have to be dealt with anyway. but this is the slippery slope of intervention, that many of us had been warning about for some weeks is the chorus of cries out there, let's go intervene, let's go do something. once you start this, it has to be finished. it will be very hard now to admit and say to gadhafi, okay, well, you got away with it, okay, now you're the leader of libya, we'll buy your oil. so now we've got a state which is at least in appearances seems to be an outlaw state. >> general clark, stand by. i just want to reset here for our viewers as we cross the top of the h
. keep it up, mate. we'll check back with you. how big is the u.s. military commitment? who is running the show? we've got just the person to answer those crucial questions. jennifer griffin is at the pentagon what. do you know? tell us about it. >> well, the u.s. right now is in charge of the commanding control of the operation. it's being led, as you've reported by general carter ham at the newest command in germany. they're overseeing it but have you an admiral on board uss mount whitney, admiral locklear overseeing for the sixth fleet the tomahawk missiles being fired from three u.s. submarines in the med terrainin. a british submarine, as well as two u.s. destroyers, stout and barry. 114 cruise missiles as mentioned, clearly the fact there are still antiaircraft being fired out of tripoli they're going to have to fire more missiles or air strikes tomorrow to assess their still doing bomb damage assessments, about half of the missiles, we understand landed in the tripoli area where gaddafi has his largest air base. then there were two sites in sert, hometown of gaddafi no. tomahawk
contributions of african-americans in this city and how each of us has changed the gee graval and cultural landscape of this city. how fitting that we celebrate black history month today, which is also the same as lunar new year and also an opportunity -- opportunity to reflect on the diversity of this city and how happy we are to be in a city which is so inclussive. so without forth delay i would like to welcome you on behalf of mator's office of neighborhood services. mayor lee will be joining us later. with the invocations, we would like to invite pastor stacey kerns. >> good amp. let us pause for a moment to invite the presence of god. shall we pray together? god, our help in ages past, our hope in years to come, we invite your holy presence to bless this celebration of african-american history month. we give up thanks and praise for the legacy, the creativity, the genius and contributions of african-american people everywhere. we pray that you would strengthen this organization and strengthen all organizations that support telling the story of black history. and so today we ask that a
us for that process, we could actually have something in place that was well tested that we could provide to them. >> mayor newsom would be sworn in as lieutenant governor in early january. so the board of supervisors had barely two months after the november election to select an interim mayor to complete gavin newsom's term. but how would the board do this? san francisco's charter guided -- offered little guidance. >> although it was obvious we would appoint an interim mayor, there was no time line for the two to occur. we looked to outside counsel for answers. they researched those questions. while they researched the legal angle, we began the research on the parliamentary level. at the beginning of the calendar year 2010, we started to craft a generic process for a successor for mayor. being a parliamentarian of the board, i have been working on the process itself. i have been working with two one and parliamentarians in the city. we did some role-playing and tried to contemplate all of the different variables that the board would encounter in appointing a successor mayor. >> t
i am mindy basara. >> and i am stan stovall. thank you for joining us this morning. sandra shaw has a check of the forecast. >> happy st. patrick's day. >> perfect weather conditions today. mid 60's's and mostly sunny skies. a nice taste of spring before it officially begins on sunday. we're in the mid to upper 40's, depending on your location. today, sunshine, 62 to 66 degrees with light wind out of the west. we will be mild tonight. mid 40's's for us with clear skies. tomorrow, it gets better -- 72 to 75, partly cloudy, a true taste of spring. let's check your morning commute. >> it looks fantastic on the major roads. at 7:00 a.m., o'donnell will close their potomac. that is for st. patrick's day parade. keep that in mind. closures will remain in effect until 7:00 a.m. on saturday. 53 miles per hour on the north side. all the major roadways leading up to the beltway are equally smooth. six minutes to travel on 95 down to the fort mchenry. 12 minutes on the outer loop west side. this is the fort mchenry. southbound traffic coming towards us running without delay. a smooth ride on t
of the globe and japan and the u.s. it would follow a little possible parcel of radiation all the way across the country and pacific. it would take many days. a lot of the radiation would be gone. there's just no threat. >> we will see. you'll keep watching, it as will i, but thanks so much for watching it here. want to turn things over to jessica yellin in "the situation room." jess, to you. >> happening now, breaking news. three nuclear reactors damaged to the core. the crisis in japan is said to be deteriorating right now. u.s. officials are suggesting the situation is more dire than many thought. with america's top nuclear watchdogs saying radiation levels are extremely high. freezing cold and snow adding to the hardship for quake and tsunami survivors there and hampering the rescue and recovery. more people now seem eager to get out of japan all together. >>> and wolf blitzer's one-on-one interview with secretary of state hillary clinton in egypt. she's talking about the disaster in japan, as well as the uprisings in libya and across the region. welcome to our viewers in the united stat
command will likely look like when the u.s. transitions to what will be essentially a nato, plus arab countries. h isep model used in afghanistan as it's described to me. we understand the u.s. and france have come to a late agree in the the last few hours there is now no discrepancy between what france wants and what the u.s. wants. the president we understand is culting short his visit to latin america. he plans to transition. i'm told we can expect a transition of command by this time next week. the headquarters likely to be at a nato headquarters in naples, italy. the f-15 fighter jet went down at 11:33 monday evening local time according to u.s. marine officials. the two airmen ejected safely after an apparent malfunction of the jet. other pilots in the air at the time say they did not see enemy fire. seven u.s. military aircraft were launched from their bases in the mediterranean to take part in the recovery. two u.s. carrier jets flew cover for the mission and defense officials confirmed dropped two bomb to separate the pilot from suspected enemy approach. the downed pilot was
us safer. >>> whenever there's a loud noise, i've always been one of those people that run towards the noise, not away. that's one of the reasons i became a volunteer firefighter. >> reporter: scott koen vividly remembers the events of 9/11, the planes that crashed in washington, dc, pennsylvania and new york city. scott wanted to do something special to honor those caught up in the terrorist attacks. >> and so i developed a project called freedom plaza, which was to use the materials from the world trade center and make a large north american bald eagle out of it on the size and scale of the statue of liberty. >> reporter: scott designed the memorial to stand where the world trade center towers had fallen. but the city of new york was already developing other plans for the site, and scott's memorial was not destined to be part of them. then, late one night, he came up with another, even more ambitious idea. >> if we were going to use steel and aluminum in an eagle. we could use the steel in a ship. >> reporter: scott was familiar with navy ships. for years he had worked at the air
us nowhere. we can never truly work together unless we stop assigning blame. the second thing we must do. we must be open to the possibility there's a better way to do things. too often as i sat through discussions ask encountered reluctance to change. i would ask you if we have things figured out. are children safe in schools? would we be here in our streets were safe? as i already said, i am not here to point fingers at anybody. if you are not part of the solution. then you are part of the problem. the other thing we have to be willing to do is check our egoes at the door and listen to each other. there are a lot of folks who love to hear themselves talk. but people who need to listen to what others say. working together means listening to each other and not taking credit. we have to have faith in each other. i know it is difficult. i know there's a lot of history and disappointment much we have to start to believe in one another again. i have seen too many times when we project to others when we believe them to be. without taking into consideration who they really are. at some poin
-- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com >>> u.s. missiles light the mediterranean sky and operation "odyssey dawn" is now under way. a coalition of western arab states launched the first strikes on libya. >>> french warplanes lead the assault. the allies' goal to stop moammar gadhafi from butchering his own people to stay in power. >> at this hour, some of the besieged towns including in benghazi in ruins but it's still in the hands of rebels. benghazi is right now, after days of pleading for help, they're finally getting it. the international community is responding right now with decisive effects. we want to welcome our viewers to this special edition of "the situation room." i'm wolf blitzer in washington. >> and i'm jonathan mann in atlanta. we welcome you to our continuing coverage of "target libya." it's been an extraordinary 48 hours. thursday afternoon, we saw the u.n. security council authorize the establishment of a no-fly zone over libya. and in just the last few hours, we have seen the first flights to bring that to the air. now, eight years to the day after u.s. militar
used helicopters to try to drop cooling water from above. but the winds and radiation levels forced it to be abandoned. he appeared on television to try to reassure his people. people are not reassured. we found families dashing to board trains south. what are you most worried about? >> i am most worried about the nuclear plants because i have small children. i want to stay far away from tokyo. >> many people live and work in tokyo come from other parts of japan. families are leaving tokyo for other parts of japan because of the fear of radiation. leaving is not an option for many. there are not enough places to go. if there is a major leak of radiation there does not seem to be a plan either. the family has not been told about it. they are watching developments further north with consternation. they have a baby and don't trust what the government is telling them. >> the government says we are safe but i don't think so. i don't trust them. >> one that? >> because [unintelligible] >> what is this? this is new? >> instead they are making their own plans. a car standing by to head sout
,138 from the california department of resources recycling and recovery for the purpose of increasing used motor oil recycling and household hazardous waste management. supervisor chu: thank you very much. we have the department of the environment here. >> the morning, supervisors. this grant is to promote used oil recycling. the focus this year is on mechanics, people in the community that change other people's oil. we are finding the bulk of the oil not being recycled properly. in front of you you have a brochure. you can see a list of drop-off locations for oil a round of the city. this is a very evenly distributed program. supervisor chu: specifically on details, it looks like he will be contracting out $52,000? >> $52,000. supervisor chu: $62,000? >> $52,000. supervisor chu: the sheet that we have says 52 -- $62,000. and this does not require any additional funding? >> correct. >> if you take a look at the budget, there are $10,000 of to be determined contracts. and 42,000 implementation on community-based out reach. it is possible that the summary sheet might be in error. supervisor
of that power point. i think we can go through this quickly. parts of this are used when we go out to the public. we use this to walk the public through the process and explain what the process is and what they need to do and how they can engage in this process. i'm going to go through this very quickly. please feel free to interrupt or ask questions as i am moving along. in march of 2010, the board approved a new system replacing students -- for placing students that will be implemented this fall. we have already launched that process with our enrollment cycle that began in november. this is still a choice process. the public has told us that they want choice. we also have the ability to link their addresses closer to this process which is also what we have heard. there is an appetite to have opportunities to go to their schools as well as exercise choice. we are trying to negotiate both of those priorities in this process. we believe that families want to engage in this and they have been very engaged in doing this. we have a new tagline. we wanted to know -- everyone to know that this is a ne
spread through the arab world, the voices of some very divided israelis and palestinians. plus, in the u.s. when catholic and noncatholic hospitals merge catholic bishops can make decisions about women's health and some doctors object. >> we can make that decision, but then it has to be okayed by someone else who puts their belief systems and their ethics on me and on my patients, which i just don't think is right. >>> welcome. i'm bob abernethy. it's good to have you with us. tensions are rising in israel, gaza and the west bank after this week's escalation of violence. faith-based groups are among those condemning wednesday's deadly bombing at a bus stop in jerusalem, the first major attack in jerusalem in four years. one person died and more than two dozen others were wounded. several u.s. jewish groups expressed their outrage. the group churches for middle east peace also denounced the violence and called on the international community to take more action to restart the peace process. in libya, fighting continued between gadhafi loyalists and the rebels, despite the international milit
, and malia cohen who are here with us today -- but it is an honor to serve with three other asian-american supervisors. we finally reflect the population statistics that we have here in san francisco. more importantly, it was an incredible honor earlier this year to take part in an historic, unanimous vote for the first time in our city's history to have an elected leader at the top of galt mountain, our first chinese- american mayor, edwin lee. [applause] as i look out onto the audience and i see who we all represent, i see our chinese a brother and sisters, our japanese and korean on and on calls, our cousins from the filipino community, the vietnamese community, the cambodian community, thai community, burmese community. i want to thank you all for making up the diaspora of our diverse community. and i want to thank those of you who are not asian on the outside but our asian on the inside. [applause] thank you for being part of the richness of who we are common here in san francisco. and i want to thank all of you who are the community leaders of this wonderful city that was fo
to building more nuclear power plants in the u.s. that is up from last year. >>> and now, it is just about that time to head it to the man, the birthday man today, wolf blitzer in "the situation room." wolf, to you. >>> thanks very much, brooke. happening now, two u.s. air force crew members make it out of a fighter jet crash in libya alive. we are taking you to the crash site and telling you how libyan rebels help keep one of them safe. >>> also, president obama is facing growing anger for ordering air strikes in libya without the approval of congress. now, one fellow democrat, even talking about possible impeachment. >>> and new u.s. assessments of the radiation risks from japan's nuclear crisis and new progress inside the plant to shed light on the damage from the sudan. i'm wolf blitzer. you are in "the situation room." >>> some very anxious hours for the u.s. military after the crash of a fighter jet, giving way to relief now that the two crew members are safely out of libya. defense officials confirming that both the pilot and the weapons officer have been rescued. they say the f-15
, the use of martyrs, tanks, and air support from the gaddafi's side. this morning, there were a couple of bombings from pro- gaddafi war planes. currently, rebel forces have moved in to the natural gas refinery, the second-largest in the country, and have now secured the premises. round one has gone to the opposition. the khadafy regime does not seem to be phased at all by these setbacks. he is railing against the west and the international community, and particularly the united states. he went on to say that there is no uprising, and no protests. he continues to say this is all about al qaeda. >> as the violence intensified in libya, u.s. officials are deciding whether to impose a new no-fly zone. defense secretary robert gates says that establishing a no-fly zone is the first move in an attack on libya, which requires a serious consideration. in the meantime, several u.s. warships have moved into the region to assist in relief efforts and evacuation. officials say the deadly shooting of two u.s. airmen in germany yesterday may have been political. be shooter confessed to starting mem
heard from the use commission is just that it is and difficult to get this done by the transportation school district. and some time, we might want to bring that up and how it is that the school district is planning to distribute those passes because that seems to be an issue with transportation. on another topic which is on the middle school pattern, i wanted to clarify that i heard correctly that you had talked about three different options that the school board would be considering. one is really to have a feeder pattern and option a, b, c. it sounds like you said that the school districts choice was option c. you are saying that that is a phased approach but i'm not sure that is really a phase in because the conversation about middle school was talked about, i think this was two years ago, it has been delayed one more year ending saturday been delayed. you would have younger siblings and test core areas. >> it can be changed. we want to have opportunities for our attendance areas and the school committees to kick in with this new process. if we were to use this process for several
projects and using them for combined heat and power for electricity. there is no problem with taking an existing steam loop or one we know is going to be built. to the extent that this plan would push us in the direction of actually encouraging more steam loops, that is not a good greenhouse gas response, so we would want you to put in language today that says a bit about how we should be focusing on passive heating and cooling, instead of using the archaic methods overpower -- method of steam loops. president vietor: thank you. hello, sir. >> good afternoon. president vietor: congratulations on the power plant. >> thank you. president vietor: you worked hard on that. >> and this would really make my day complete, moving this along. i have been on the power plant taskforce since its inception, and i think that is 11 years now. we pushed hard, and we got the first electric resource plan, an ordinance that made both the department of the environment and the puc -- which was adopted in 2002. since then, we have been encouraging either side or all sides to keep it up. things have changed
from u.s. and british ships and submarines struck more than 20 intergreated air defense systems and other air defense facilities ashore. >> geraldo: this is a fox news alert. today, after a painful but ultimately successful week long effort to enlist international support in an operation named odyssey dawn the united states military led the air and naval forces of two of our closest allies, france and britain in launching a massive attack which we are told has already severely disabled the air defenses of the dictator who refuses to stop his vicious assault on his own people. hi, everybody. i'm geraldo rivera. welcome to our two hour special report on the day the libyan civil war became our fight. the offensive to protect libya's people from their own government and ultimately take down the madman who has plagued us for more than four decades began saturday when french jets soared over qaddafi's forces besieging the rebel held city of benghazi, reportedly taking out four of qaddafi's tanks. the initial french action was soon dwarfed by a huge salvo of cruz missiles. 11 114 fired
of nuclear energy here in the u.s., we continue our coverage of japan's massive earthquake. you're watching "nightly business report" for monday, march 14. this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program is made possible this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> susie: good evening everyone. my colleague tom hudson is off tonight. it's day four of japan's monstrous earthquake and tsunami, and the full brunt of the damage is still unknown. the death toll is expected to exceed 10,000 and the country continues to battle the threat of a catastrophic nuclear accident. now japan is focused on the enormous human suffering, but attention around the world is also shifting to the economic consequences of the disaster. many economists believe the country is likely to slide into recession. so what will that mean for the rest of the world? suzanne pratt reports. >> reporter: there's no question the human toll of japan's epic earthquake and tsunam
intervention in libya diplomatic preure is growing. the u.s., britain and france warned gaddafi to hold the advance and pull back on other cities. this comes on the heels of a decision to propose a no-fly zone. gaddafi has declared a cease- fire but rebels say government forces continued their assault. >> for these rebels the no-fly zone cannot come soon enough. the resolution gives me new hope. >> there for libya has decided on an immediate cease-fire and stoppage of all operations. >> that announcement has been received with skepticism. >> the libyan people have called for international assistance. this resolution paves the way for that to be answered. colonel gaddafi's refusal to hear the repeated calls to stop violence against his own people has left us with no other choice. >> the international community will not be tricked by the libyan regime. the international community will verify strict compliance with the resolution. >> at the nato headquarters preparations were made to pave the way for operations to begin this weekend. >> we now havthe power and legal basis to stop. that is
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